Home » The Chosin Chronology: Battle of Changjin Reservoir, 1950 by George A. Rasula
The Chosin Chronology: Battle of Changjin Reservoir, 1950 George A. Rasula

The Chosin Chronology: Battle of Changjin Reservoir, 1950

George A. Rasula

Published 2006
ISBN :
ebook
232 pages
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 About the Book 

The Chosin Chronology has had as its driving force a combat experience in a foreign land, a type of experience remembered by a few, most of whom saw that action from the rear sight of a rifle, thereby limiting their knowledge and understanding of theMoreThe Chosin Chronology has had as its driving force a combat experience in a foreign land, a type of experience remembered by a few, most of whom saw that action from the rear sight of a rifle, thereby limiting their knowledge and understanding of the big picture. Because of the variety of experiences, there emerged various versions of what actually happened when and where. The Chosin campaign was actually a series of separate battles that took place between 27 November - 12 December 1950. Although the battle took place at the Changjin Reservoir in North Korea, many prefer the Japanese name Chosin because of the maps then available. That word then became the foundation for the frozen Chosin and also The Chosin Few, a Chosin veterans association.When survivors of that campaign boarded ships and sailed out of the Hungnam harbor, those with enough energy took the time to stand at the rail to watch the mountains of North Korea recede into the distance, knowing that within those mountains lay the remains of more than a thousand soldiers. That was their farewell in December 1950. During those moments I had mixed feelings. On the one hand, I wanted to know more about the so-called Chosin Reservoir campaign, yet, and equally compelling, I felt the need to shake it loose and get on with life.Years later former soldiers and marines were alerted by calls from other survivors, drawing them into a brotherhood, an association named The Chosin Few which had its first biannual reunion in 1985. It was during those early years when I once again sensed the need to know more about Chosin: what happened and why. They said it was a time for healing those deep inner-wounds that always remain after such a traumatic experience. As years went by the sound of semper fi rang loudly in reunion hallways while experiences voiced from lecterns continued to emphasize Yudam-ni, Hagaru-ri and the breakout from there, with little attention given to the east side of the reservoir which today, these many decades later, continues to be the resting place of more than a thousand soldiers. The story had to be told. That’s when stories gave birth to more questions, with the answers to be divulged in the enclosed History of the Chosin Story. Yes, even the Chosin story has its own history.During twenty years of research we concentrated on what happened. Eventually it led to the sequence of significant combat actions which we call The Chosin Chronology. This e-book consists of a compilation of documents that separate the wheat from the chaff, the basis of which is a sequential sketch in the form of words, maps and photographs. By following the chronology, one will emerge with a clear general understanding of what happened, and why.Connected to the chronology are volumes of detailed information that are revealed as links to The Changin Journal, documents published on the web page of the New York Military Affairs Symposium (www.nymas.org). Also included are archives of maps and photographs. The 47 maps that make up the chronology are of topographic quality created by Mel Coolbaugh who designed them for maximum understanding (and minimum clutter as found on military topo maps). These maps are supported by a Map Archive which contains sections of actual 1:50,000 or 1:250,000 topographic maps- helpful are elevations (contours) and 1,000 meter grid lines for quick reference to distances. As you continue through the story of the Chosin, keep in mind that the words Chosin (printed on 1950 maps) and Changjin, the Korean name of the reservoir, are interchangeable herein.George Arthur Rasula